Drake Completely Roasts Kanye West And Pusha T In New Freestyle And Holy Sh*t, It’s Wild

In case you missed it, there’s some beef in the rap industry right now–and no, it’s not Nicki Minaj and Cardi B.
Recently, rapper Pusha T dropped his new album “Daytona,” which was produced by Kanye West.

On the album, there’s one specific track–”Infrared”–which is a direct diss at rapper Drake and his label “Young Money,” with Lil Wayne and Baby. He takes shots at Drake saying that he doesn’t write his own lyrics and hires ghostwriters instead. He also comes for his other friends and his label.

Drake–in response–dropped a freestyle that directly came back at both Pusha and Kanye West. The song–”Duppy Freestyle”–calls out both rappers for their lame games. Duppy, if you don’t know, means ghost in Jamaican patois (a direct clap back at the accusation that Drake uses ghostwriters).

Here’s a breakdown of the fire lyrics:

Pusha T on “Infrared”:

It was written like Nas but it came from Quentin
At the mercy of a game where the codes is missing

Pusha T:

The only rapper sold more dope than me was Eazy-E
How could you ever right these wrongs
When you don’t even write your songs
But let us all play along
We all know what niggas for real been waiting on

Drake came back saying that he may have helped Quentin by hiring him and helping him get a better life and job. As well, he came back at Pusha for “bragging” about selling drugs like he’s Pablo Escobar.

Drake on “Duppy”:

And as for Q, man I changed his life a couple times
N*gga was at Kroger working double time
Y’all acting like he made the boy when I was trying to help the guy
Yeah, who gassed you to play with me?
Man, you made this shit easy as ABCs
Whoever supposedly making me hits, but then got no hits sound like they need me
My hooks did it, my lyrics did it, my spirit did it

Drake:

Your brother said, it was your cousin then him, then you
So, you don’t rap what you did, you just rap what you knew
Don’t be ashamed, it’s plenty n*ggas that do what you do
There’s no malice in your heart, you’re an approachable dude
Man, you might’ve sold the college kids for Nikes and Mercedes
But, you act like you sold drugs for Escobar in the ‘80s

He then took the time to whip Kanye West into shape, calling him out by using his lyrics “Father Stretch My Hands,” because Drake is apparently the one who wrote it.

He also called him out by saying he held his friend Virgil back from succeeding because he didn’t want him to be more successful than himself.

Drake:

What do you really think of the n*gga that’s making your beats?
I’ve done things for him I thought that he never would need
Father had to stretch his hands out and get it from me
I pop style for 30 hours, then let him repeat

You not even top 5 as far as your label talent goes
You send shots, well, I got to challenge those
But I bring Calicos to the Alamo
I could never have a Virgil in my circle and hold him back ‘cause he makes me nervous

To top it all off, Drake hit the bar off by saying he was going to invoice Ye and Pusha for the song–which would sell all of Pusha’s albums for him just so they can hear the beef.

I told Weezy and Baby “I’ma done him for you”
Tell ‘Ye we got a invoice coming to you
Considering that we just sold another 20 for you

Pusha called Drizzy out on Twitter saying: send me the invoice.

So that’s what Drake f*cking did.

You’re welcome. ?

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Ever since the freestyle dropped, Twitter has been going off saying that Drake dragged them. And, to be honest, he really did. The co-founder of Kanye West’s late mother’s foundation even asked Drake if he could use some of that money from West’s label to help rebuild Donda West (Kanye’s mom’s) house–seeing as Kanye had unkind words about it…

Twitter has just been seriously pro-Drake all day long.

Lex Gabrielle

Written by Lex Gabrielle

Lex Gabrielle native New Yorker who supports messy buns and all things covered in buffalo sauce. She is currently a managing editor for BloomJoy and teaches English and Journalism to the youth of America.